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Gallery of Cars

email us at : cargallery@mitymounts.com
DynaTech's Projects
1968 Mustang GT390
Before

Rare 1968 Mustang big-block GT 390 Fastback, four-speed. The car was purchased in 1987 in the condition shown, after it had been run into the back of a truck. The hood, left fender, grille, radiator and front unibody structure were all badly damaged. It was a tough decision whether to pay the $700 asking price! But I was taken by the car's complete originality and 20,000-mile odometer. It was rust-free and perfect before the wreck. It hadn't even been registered since 1973
After
I restored the car to better than its previous glory using new Ford sheetmetal and unibody parts from a donor vehicle. With minor work, the body was so perfect that an inexpensive paint job made all surfaces like mirrors.

Hardly sat-in
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Hardly sat-in
The original interior was near perfect. A new cluster bezel and carpet were all that was needed to bring back the showroom appearance.

Heart of the beast
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Heart of the beast
Original high-compression 390 with factory-rated 335hp. MityMounts® replaced the originals that were sheared in the wreck.

"The Man's" equalizer
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1974 Dodge Coronet 440 Police Interceptor
"The Man's" equalizer
Every street-racer's fear was a lean Mopar B-body, big-block police car in his rear-view mirror. This original example was discovered on one of DynaTech's weekly junkyard excursions in 1994. After noticing the certified speedometer, we checked the VIN and discovered the giveaway "K" code, indicating the car had been built to police specification. We immediately purchased the car for $275 and began our first junkyard restoration, using almost entirely junkyard parts.

Not well known is that Mopar police cars in the 1960's and early 1970's were built to entirely different specifications than standard passenger cars. Unlike other manufacturers, Chrysler actually shut down their assembly lines each year and re-tooled to police specifications to create these special cars. In addition to hundreds of improved engine, drivetrain and suspension parts, these cars received 3,000 extra unibody welds for improved rigidity.

Even after an estimated 200,000 miles, this car cornered like a sports car and stopped on a dime. The gigantic Kelsey-Hayes brakes would simply not fade, no matter how badly they were abused. But the most fun of all was using this car as an early DynaTech platform for acceptance testing of MityMounts®. DynaTech Engineers attempted to break prototype MityMounts® in countless acceleration tests. This car would lay over 100 feet of rubber at any time, and the winner of the burnout competition laid dark black patches on the asphalt over 130 feet long!

Sadly, after we could think of no new testing ideas (and how we tried!), the car was sold to an east-coast collector in 1999.


Feel lucky, punk?
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Feel lucky, punk?
The original 440 Interceptor motor was tired, but couldn't be killed. The reason the car was in the junkyard was a $15 ignition pick-up coil. The engine's conservative SAE (net) horsepower rating was 275; SAE Gross would put it in the mid 300's. With its light weight (about 3,600 lbs.), this car in stock form would run low 14-second quarter miles on sticky tires.

The patrolman's office
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The patrolman's office
Interior restoration was done entirely with parts from Pick-a-Part, even the seat covers and headliner! The original police front seat was preserved, since it had extra springs and support for hard driving conditions. The entire parts bill for restoration was about $500, and this included major repairs on the air conditioning. Notice the dual spotlights, red magnetic beacon and siren control that is under the dash, below the steering wheel.
 

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